Aebleskiver

Aebleskiver

76 Reviews 12 Pics
  • Prep

    15 m
  • Cook

    15 m
  • Ready In

    30 m
Lisa G.
Recipe by  Lisa G.

“Aebleskiver - a Danish dessert, like doughnut holes, but sweeter and much better traditionally served with glogg during the Advent. Cooked in a cast iron pan that resembles an egg poacher. Serve hot with syrup, jam or powdered sugar.”

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Ingredients

Adjust Servings

Original recipe yields 30 aebleskivers

Directions

  1. In a clean glass or metal bowl, beat the egg whites with an electric mixer until they can hold a stiff peak. Set aside.
  2. Mix together the flour, baking powder, salt, baking soda, sugar, egg yolks, melted butter and buttermilk at one time and beat until smooth. Gently fold in the egg whites last.
  3. Put about 1tablespoon of vegetable oil in the bottom of each aebleskiver pan cup and heat until hot. Pour in about 2 tablespoons of the batter into each cup. As soon as they get bubbly around the edge, turn them quickly (Danish cooks use a long knitting needle, but a fork will work). Continue cooking, turning the ball to keep it from burning.

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Reviews (76)

Rate This Recipe
Christian Rasmussen
577

Christian Rasmussen

Never use oil, only butter in the pan. The name in danish is Æbleskiver which means Appleslices (I know they're not slices, but that's the name). So if you want to make them like we do in Denmark, and always have done, you need to put a piece of apple in every one of them. When they're done cooking on one side put a small piece of skinless apple in to the middle, turn them around with a knitting needle to finish cooking them on the other side. You can also use applesauce instead. Time to eat them, dip them in your favorite jam (we use jam from nordic berries like strawberry, my favorite), then dip them in icing sugar, eat and enjoy. We're not only eating them at Christmas but at any occasion. More traditional Christmas cookies are ``Klejner (don't know what to call them in english)´´ and ``Pebernødder (peppernuts)´´. I'll post recipes later.

GARLAND
180

GARLAND

I am also Danish. My Grandma taught us to break open the "ball" while still warm or hot and dip in brown sugar. mmmmm She used a crochet hook to turn them over.

BOBBYEG
131

BOBBYEG

Very light. Delicious! I have owned a pan for many years but never used it until today. It was a very easy and delicious recipe. It is best to use a knitting needle (really!) or a pointed stick to turn them. A fork made too many holes and wasn't as easy to get them to turn right. My pan may have been smaller, used less oil and batter in cup. Preheat pan, and keep temp. constant.

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Nutrition

Amount Per Serving (30 total)

  • Calories
  • 63 cal
  • 3%
  • Fat
  • 2.8 g
  • 4%
  • Carbs
  • 7.7 g
  • 2%
  • Protein
  • 1.8 g
  • 4%
  • Cholesterol
  • 18 mg
  • 6%
  • Sodium
  • 125 mg
  • 5%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

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