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Strawberry, Ginger and Mint Sekanjabin

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The Magpie

This syrup is based on an ancient Persian recipe, and it keeps virtually indefinitely without any special care. Excellent for camping, and truly refreshing on a hot, hot day! And there's no waste, you use every part of every ingredient in this stuff. After straining, remove the lemon peels and ginger and toss in a bag of sugar for a candied treat!

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Directions

  1. Bring the sugar and water to a boil over high heat. Boil until the sugar has dissolved, then stir in the strawberries, mint, ginger, lemon peels, and lemon juice. Return to a boil, then reduce heat to medium and simmer for 20 minutes. Remove from heat, and stir in the white balsamic vinegar.
  2. Allow the syrup to stand overnight at room temperature, then strain out the fruits with a fine sieve. Store at room temperature in a sterile container.
  3. To use, stir 1 part syrup into 4 to 6 parts water; serve cold with ice if desired.
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Reviews

Cassie
25
4/26/2012

So amazing! I had never heard of Sekanjabin before, but I googled it and now I know...But anyway I was afraid to use the white balsamic vinegar, but it is SO GOOD! my 2 year old daughter loves it! It is perfect prepared as written. The strawberry taste is great. The store had Pear infused white balsamic as well as Raspberry infused for the same price and I think that may taste good as well. Thanks!

aimee
17
8/27/2008

Very flavourful. I made it with the same quantities, but my kids found the ginger nad lenmon flavour too strong, so I made the same thing (but a lesser quantity) omitting the lemon and ginger, let it rest overnight with the balsamic vinegar, and added this to the first sekanjabin. The result is a fuller strawberry flavour, with the wonderful after-taste of lemony-ginger. HMM! Thank you for sharing.

momof3boys
15
3/30/2008

This is wonderful. I was suprised by the vinegar but it prompted me to learn more about Sekanjabin. Thanks for a great recipe and cultural lesson.