Search thousands of recipes reviewed by home cooks like you.

Blue Ribbon Mincemeat Pie Filling

Blue Ribbon Mincemeat Pie Filling

Cali

An old-time delicious mincemeat pie filling. I have frozen this filling in zip-lock baggies, since I don't use a pressure canner. Apple cider can be used in place of brandy if preferred.

Ingredients {{adjustedServings}} servings

Serving size has been adjusted!

Original recipe yields 32 servings

Adjust

Nutrition

Amount per serving ({{servings}} total)

  • Calories:
  • 336 kcal
  • 17%
  • Fat:
  • 9.9 g
  • 15%
  • Carbs:
  • 50.3g
  • 16%
  • Protein:
  • 9.1 g
  • 18%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 35 mg
  • 12%
  • Sodium:
  • 36 mg
  • 1%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

Directions

  1. In a large skillet over medium heat, cook the ground beef thoroughly. Being sure not to over-brown it.
  2. Place chopped apples and the cooked ground beef in a food processor and pulse until the mixture is made up of pea sized chunks.
  3. In a non-reactive skillet combine the apple and ground beef mixture with the raisins, brandy, ground cinnamon, ground allspice, ground nutmeg and the white sugar. Simmer for 30 minutes.
  4. Cool filling to lukewarm and pour into freezer bags (2 cups per bag). Freeze filling until needed. One baggie will fill one 8 inch double crust pie. Thaw filling before using.
Rate recipe

Your rating

{{ratingWords}}
Cancel
Submit

Reviews

pkcoleman
86
12/6/2008

I have some die hard mincemeat lovers, so I tried this recipe, and it was a hit! As a note to a comment above, although many people now make mincemeat without meat; traditionally it was made with meat. Mincemeat developed as a way of preserving meat without salting or smoking some 500 years ago in England, where mince pies are still considered an essential accompaniment to holiday dinners just like the traditional plum pudding. This pie is a remnant of a medieval tradition of spiced meat dishes, usually minced mutton, that have survived because of its association with Christmas. These pies have also been known as Christmas Pies. Mince pie as part of the Christmas table had long been an English custom. Today, we are accustomed to eating mince pie as a dessert, but actually "minced" pie and its follow-up "mincemeat pie" began as a main course dish with with more meat than fruit (a mixture of meat, dried fruits, and spices). As fruits and spices became more plentiful in the 17th century, the spiciness of the pies increased accordingly.

ALAEGALANA
40
10/6/2003

I made this for a Victorian Christmas for six people, and two of them liked it so much they fought over who got to take the leftovers home. It's perfect for any get together!

SHEWETT
35
12/26/2006

First thing I did was to scale this down to 10 servings and it made 1 pie. I made it with a double batch of "Basic Flaky Pie Crust" found on this website. Since I have never eaten a mincemeat pie, I have nothing to compare this to, and I don't know how authenic the flavor is. BUT I liked this pie. It was very good. The only thing I did different is to use apple juice in place of the brandy. Good.