Firehouse Clam Bake New England Style

Firehouse Clam Bake New England Style

5

"Growing up along the Eastern seaboard in Rhode Island, seafood is a staple of the state! This is a wonderful recipe that is prepared right on the beach!! A lot of work, but well worth it! You'll have to collect a lot of stones and seaweed for this dish."

Ingredients

5 h servings 999 cals
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Original recipe yields 40 servings

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Nutrition

  • Calories:
  • 999 kcal
  • 50%
  • Fat:
  • 48.2 g
  • 74%
  • Carbs:
  • 49.3g
  • 16%
  • Protein:
  • 89.5 g
  • 179%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 294 mg
  • 98%
  • Sodium:
  • 2368 mg
  • 95%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

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Directions

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  1. At the beach dig a hole in the sand with the approximate proportions: width = 2 feet, length = 4 feet, depth = 1-1/2 feet. Line the hole with stones from the beach. Build a fire inside of the hole and cover with rocks from the beach. Heat the stones for 2 to 3 hours.
  2. Remove coals and/or embers from the hole. Arrange hot stones evenly across the bottom of the hole. Place fresh 1/2 bushel seaweed (wet) on top of the hot stones.
  3. Working quickly layer the food on top of the seaweed, the food should be layered evenly on top of each other in the following order: clams, mussels, fish, sausage, hotdogs (wrapped in cheesecloth), onions, potatoes (white and sweet), corn, and finally lobsters.
  4. Cover food with a clean, wet cloth. Place remaining seaweed on top of cloth.
  5. Cover entire hole of food with a wet tarpaulin, sealing the steam created by the hot stones and seaweed in. Allow a very small amount of steam to escape to relieve pressure. Let bake cook for 1 or more hours. The bake is completed when the potatoes are soft. Serve bake with melted butter to dip the seafood in and lobster crackers. Don't forget napkins -- you'll need 'em!

Reviews

5

Because there doesn't seem to be a beach in N.J. that would allow anyone to cook on it, we had to take the traditional route and use the stove to steam the food. Of course we cut way back on the...

I grew up in Maine, but now live in the Midwest. On a trip back to my home state I loaded up a cooler full of the seafood straight out of the fish markets and drove straight back only stopping t...

Loved this, loved this! We spent a day on the Oregon coast clamming and crabbing. Pit cooking just brings out all the flavor of the seafood. Instead of lobsters, we used dungess crabs and hal...

This makes for a great day at the beach! We used less variety (no sweet potatoes, or sausage or bratworst, or mussels, for example) but the flavor of the fresh-cooked meal brings you to heaven's...

This is one of the best ways to have a Clam Bake, and the seaweeds a must. I grew up and live in Rhode Island and look forward to a summer time clam bake every year. Thanks for sharing this wond...