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Ciabatta Bread

Ciabatta Bread

  • Prep

    30 m
  • Cook

    25 m
  • Ready In

    1 h 55 m
Marina

Marina

This very simple recipe can be made in the bread machine using the dough cycle. I make it at least 3 times a week.

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Ingredients {{adjustedServings}} servings

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Original recipe yields 24 servings

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Nutrition

Amount per serving ({{servings}} total)

  • Calories:
  • 73 kcal
  • 4%
  • Fat:
  • 0.9 g
  • 1%
  • Carbs:
  • 13.7g
  • 4%
  • Protein:
  • 2.3 g
  • 5%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 0 mg
  • 0%
  • Sodium:
  • 146 mg
  • 6%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

Directions

  1. Place ingredients into the pan of the bread machine in the order suggested by the manufacturer. Select the Dough cycle, and Start. (See Editor's Note for stand mixer instructions.)
  2. Dough will be quite sticky and wet once cycle is completed; resist the temptation to add more flour. Place dough on a generously floured board, cover with a large bowl or greased plastic wrap, and let rest for 15 minutes.
  3. Lightly flour baking sheets or line them with parchment paper. Using a serrated knife, divide dough into 2 pieces, and form each into a 3x14-inch oval. Place loaves on prepared sheets and dust lightly with flour. Cover, and let rise in a draft-free place for approximately 45 minutes.
  4. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C).
  5. Spritz loaves with water. Place loaves in the oven, positioned on the middle rack. Bake until golden brown, 25 to 30 minutes.
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Reviews

Rodney Dowdle
796

Rodney Dowdle

4/9/2006

Good results! As a culinary student I've tried and failed with bread many times before getting some decent results. Here's what I've found that may help: 1) Proof your yeast as directed (mixing water, yeast, & sugar)-- if it doesn't start bubbling or frothing after 10 min, throw it out. Either the yeast is dead (check expiration date) Or you killed it with HOT tap water > 120 degrees F kills yeast. Optimal temp is LUKE warm around 100F. 2) Mist the bread with water every 3 min for the first 10 min. Why? This does 3 things. Prevents the crust from forming too fast thus restricting the rising process. It moisens the crust just enough so it doesn't brown/burn at the end of the baking period - you get a golden brown instead of a dark heavy crust. And it finally makes the crust crispier. This is a very important step. It also helps if you have a bowl of water in the oven to increase the humidity percentage. Professional ovens have adjustable humidity controls which add moisture in. Why only 10 min? You can mist for longer but you'll end up with a thin white crust instead of golden brown. Once the bread has risen to its full potential (within the 1st 10 min or so depending on the size of the loaf), then you want it to start becoming golden brown. Baking is regarded as being harder than cooking because of the exactness in ratios of the ingredients. Hope some of my hard lessons learned helps you -- Best of luck!

maegan b.
465

maegan b.

3/15/2007

This recipe was awesome! I skipped the bread machine business and made it by hand...the dough was sticky but it worked well enough, just start the yeast in the warm water for a few minutes before throwing in the rest of the ingredients. Instead of loaves I made rolls and they turned out great. I also added 3 tablespoons of dried rosemary to the dough which made all the difference. They were a huge hit with my kids, my daughter told me they tasted just like the bread at our favorite Italian food place and she was right! Misting the dough during baking with a spray bottle is a MUST. Don't skip this step, it's what makes the crust so crispy.

ALSTONS4
343

ALSTONS4

12/17/2007

Wonderful recipe ~ so easy. Everytime I make it I get rave reviews!! Easy hint, use spatula to scrape out of breadmaker onto a heavily floured board. Then use a metal scraper to scrape/scoop/lift the floured dough into a rectangle and then plop onto a silpat/greased cookie sheet. This is a rustic bread so it will be chewy with large holes. You really can't use your hands, they'll goo up and you won't be able to handle it. Develop the lift and fold over technique with the scraper and it'll be a breeze.

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