Quince Paste

Quince Paste

6
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"The quince is an old-fashioned, intensely aromatic, and dearly loved fruit. It is not an easy fruit to prepare, as it needs to be poached or cooked before it can be used in recipes. Quince paste is a wonderful accompaniment to cheese and crackers-try chevre as well as other mild, firm cheeses. You can also serve it for breakfast in place of jam."

Ingredients

5 h servings 169 cals
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Original recipe yields 32 servings

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Nutrition

  • Calories:
  • 169 kcal
  • 8%
  • Fat:
  • 0.1 g
  • < 1%
  • Carbs:
  • 44.1g
  • 14%
  • Protein:
  • 0.3 g
  • < 1%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 0 mg
  • 0%
  • Sodium:
  • 3 mg
  • < 1%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

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Directions

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  1. Wash, peel, and core the quinces, reserving the cores and peels. Coarsely chop the flesh and transfer the fruit to a large pan. Wrap the cores and peels in cheesecloth, tie the bag with kitchen string, and add it to the pan. (The peels contain most of the fruit's pectin, which contributes to the firmness of the quince paste.)
  2. Pour in enough water to cover the quinces and boil, half-covered, for 30 to 40 minutes or until the fruit is very soft. Remove the bag of peels and pass the quince flesh through a sieve or food mill. (For best results, don't use a food processor as it will result in too fine a texture.) You should have about 2 1/2 pounds of fruit pulp.
  3. Transfer the quince pulp to a saucepan and add the sugar (ideally, you should add the same amount of sugar, by weight, as the fruit pulp). Cook and stir over low heat until the sugar is dissolved. Continue cooking for about 1 1/2 hours, stirring frequently with a wooden spoon, until the paste becomes very thick and has a deep orange color. Draw the wooden spoon along the bottom of the saucepan: it should leave a trail and the quince mixture will stick to the spoon.
  4. Lightly grease a 9x13-inch baking dish or line it with greased parchment paper. Transfer the quince paste to the baking dish, spreading it about 1 1/2-inch thick. Smooth the top and allow it to cool.
  5. Dry the paste on your lowest oven setting, no more than 125 degrees F (52 degrees C), for about 1 1/2 hours. Allow the quince paste to cool completely before slicing. (In Europe, the traditional method of drying the quince paste is to leave it in a cupboard for about 7 days. The remaining juices will continue to evaporate and render a drier paste.)
  6. Store quince paste in an airtight container in the refrigerator; the color will deepen with age.

Footnotes

  • Editor's Note
  • In Provence, quince paste is often served with cheeses from the Savoy region. In Spain and Portugal, quince paste (Membrillo) is served with manchego. Serve slices of quince paste with cheese or as a breakfast spread.
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Reviews

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  1. 7 Ratings

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I have just moved to a new house, and new country, and am blessed with a number of fruit/nut trees, one being a lovely good sized quince, have tried a number of recipes and this one is the simpl...

While preparing another quince recipe I discovered what a royal PITA it is to core and peel quince. So... when I looked at this recipe I decided to invert it. I halved the quinces, put them in...

This was outstanding! I was so excited to see this recipe on here, because I’m crazy about quince. The first time I tried them, I thought, “Where has this fruit been all my life?!” I think I add...

This recipe was so easy! Someone at work brought some quinces in and didn't know what they were. He stated his grandmother used them all time when he was kid. So I make this paste and served it ...

This was so good! We ate it as a little sweet treat with meals. It was good alone or on toast. Great recipe!

I halved it -- using 1 cup of sugar for 2 pounds of quince. Still too sweet