dandelion-wine

Dandelion Wine

8 Reviews Add a Pic
  • Prep

    1 h
  • Cook

    10 m
  • Ready In

    21 d 1 h 10 m
Elle
Recipe by  Elle

“This very old recipe utilizes the bane of homeowners: the dandelion! I found this in 1993 when a flood left our front yard full of beautiful, very large dandelions. The blossoms CANNOT have been sprayed with any pesticides, and should be thoroughly rinsed.”

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Ingredients

Adjust Servings

Original recipe yields 4 quart jars

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Directions

  1. Place dandelion blossoms in the boiling water, and allow to stand for 4 minutes. Remove and discard the blossoms, and let the water cool to 90 degrees F (32 degrees C).
  2. Stir in the yeast, sugar, orange slices, and lemon slice; pour into a plastic fermentor, and attach a fermentation lock. Let the wine ferment in a cool area until the bubbles stop, 10 to 14 days. Siphon the wine off of the lees, and strain through cheesecloth before bottling in quart-sized, sterilized canning jars with lids and rings. Age the wine at least a week for best flavor.

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Reviews (8)

Rate This Recipe
knowan
36

knowan

A few notes on what's wrong with this recipe: 1) Double the amount of dandelion flowers. The flowers are best picked at mid-morning to mid-day. When preparing them remove all the green, especially the green stalk which is very bitter. Most of the green sepals should be removed as well, but if a few get through that's fine, they'll add some body. 2) Allow the flowers to steep for 2 days, not 4 minutes. Keep the pot covered during this time. 3) After 2 days strain off the flowers, add the remaining ingredients except the yeast, but as others have noted only use half the sugar. 1-2 lbs (2-4 cups) of sugar will be plenty, depending on how dry or sweet you like your wine. 4) Bring it back to a boil for 10 minutes and then put the liquid into your sterilized primary fermentator. After it has cooled to roughly 30 C or 90 F add the wine yeast (not baker's yeast, although that might do in a pinch) and the fermentation lock. When the bubbling has mostly subsided (10-14 days) remove the liquid from the lees and rack it for 2 months before bottling (unless you like exploding bottles). Like all wines, it's best if it's aged in the bottle for at least a year, although there'll be a noticible improvement after just 6 months.

Hungryguy123
32

Hungryguy123

It was great

THEPETALER
26

THEPETALER

This was a bit sweet, but I can tame that next time - easy to make too! I'm going to experiment with this next time, I like it alot. Thanks for sharing!

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