Sicilian Homemade Ricotta Cheese

Sicilian Homemade Ricotta Cheese

32
Orcashottie 14

"This is a recipe for my Sicilian grandmother's creamy homemade ricotta cheese. Great as a spread on fresh bread or add as a topping to fresh Pasta."

Ingredients

55 m servings 219 cals
Serving size has been adjusted!

Original recipe yields 20 servings

Adjust

Nutrition

  • Calories:
  • 219 kcal
  • 11%
  • Fat:
  • 15.6 g
  • 24%
  • Carbs:
  • 11.8g
  • 4%
  • Protein:
  • 8.4 g
  • 17%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 54 mg
  • 18%
  • Sodium:
  • 427 mg
  • 17%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

On Sale

What's on sale near you.

Directions

Print
  • Prep

  • Cook

  • Ready In

  1. Line a large colander or sieve with 4 layers of cheesecloth. Set aside.
  2. Heat milk, buttermilk, heavy cream, and salt in a large, heavy, nonreactive saucepan over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally for the first 10 minutes. Continue heating, without stirring, until the temperature reaches 190 degrees F. Remove from heat and let stand for 1 hour. The mixture will be separated into white curds and clear whey.
  3. Using a slotted spoon, ladle approximately 1/4 of the curds into the cheesecloth-lined colander. Gather up the corners of the top cheesecloth and secure closed with a zip tie. Repeat with the rest of the curds, cheesecloth, and zip ties. Use the last zip tie to thread all of the cheeses together. Suspend the cheeses over a large wooden spoon over a large bowl, and let drain for 2 hours.
  4. Place the four cheeses, still in cloth, in a bowl in the refrigerator overnight. In the morning, cut zip ties, and transfer cheese to an airtight container.

Reviews

32
  1. 37 Ratings

  2.  
  3.  
  4.  
  5.  
  6.  
Most helpful

Here are some tips I found out: 1. A nonreactive saucepan refers to using any type of pot except aluminum and copper which would react with the acids in the milk; a heavy-bottomed pot is prefer...

Most helpful critical

This recipe was ok but it cost more for a gallon of milk than it is to buy ricotta cheese at the super market so I will probably not make again. Turned out ok with the fresh ricotta taste when I...

Here are some tips I found out: 1. A nonreactive saucepan refers to using any type of pot except aluminum and copper which would react with the acids in the milk; a heavy-bottomed pot is prefer...

I didn't have the cream, but made ricotta for the first time in my 70+ years. It's delicious and I'll make lasagna and use part of the ricotta tomorrow. The whey looked so nutritious and I dec...

I'd say this will yeild about 2 lbs of cheese. You can freeze your whey in cup containers, use it in pancakes/waffles, muffins and bread. Anywhere a recipe calls for water. Be creative, it's wor...

A VERY nice and creamy result. I left the heavy cream out (since others mentioned it was OK and it wasn't readily available in my fridge) and used 2% milk. Wasn't real sure what I was looking ...

I had some leftover whole milk (about 2 C), buttermilk (about 1 1/2 C) and heavy cream (about 1 C) so I impulsively made this throwing in 1 tsp kosher salt. I accidentally let the mixture rise ...

Wonderful! I am originally from Italy and find that the store bought ricotta often has a plastic container taste. I made this once and it was wonderful. Look forward to making it again.

Fantastic. I will never buy ricotta again. It is so easy and taste is very fresh. I put it on top of penne with marinara, add sugar substitute and top with fresh berries and have even added h...

I am beyond thrilled with this recipe. It is incredibly easy and delivers a light, fresh, creamy tasting cheese. I made 2 batches of cheese and my egg-less semolina pasta for ravioli. I got 12...

This recipe can be very useful to me as I make a lot of Italian dishes and Ricotta is like Ice Cream to me... I can sit and eat it from the container. I also have the question that the first re...