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Tender Moose

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keydancer

This works with any tough meat. I use it with moose or beef. Do vary the sauce to your taste. Barbecue, wine, and onion-based sauces are usually best for disguising the gaminess. It's the cooking method that tenderizes, not the sauce.

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Nutrition

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  • Calories:
  • 332 kcal
  • 17%
  • Fat:
  • 1.7 g
  • 3%
  • Carbs:
  • 34.4g
  • 11%
  • Protein:
  • 41.5 g
  • 83%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 110 mg
  • 37%
  • Sodium:
  • 1147 mg
  • 46%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

Directions

  1. Place a steamer insert into a saucepan, and fill with water to just below the bottom of the steamer. Add the bay leaves and onion flakes to the water. Cover, and bring the water to a boil over high heat; reduce heat to medium low to maintain a simmer. Add the moose, recover, and steam until fork tender, 1 1/2 to 2 hours depending on thickness, adding water to the pot as needed.
  2. Pour the barbecue sauce into a large sauce pan over medium heat; once warm, add the moose and reduce heat to low; simmer 45 minutes.
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Reviews

shirley
3
1/18/2011

Awesome and very tastey!!

Devra N
0
11/16/2014

This is the best way to cook tougher cuts of moose or any game meat like this. It was tender and I could do anything with it after it was steamed. I put a clove of garlic in the boiling water and salt and peppered the moose meat. My husband said to keep this way of cooking moose handy.

taxgirl
0
10/14/2012

I don't normally cook or eat wild game, but with this recipe I will be. No wild taste at all, my mom would be proud of you, thank you.