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Cantonese Lean Pork Congee

Cantonese Lean Pork Congee

  • Prep

    25 m
  • Cook

    45 m
  • Ready In

    1 h 10 m
Vivian Lee

Vivian Lee

This is a favorite brunch item served in dim sum restaurants.

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Ingredients {{adjustedServings}} servings

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Original recipe yields 4 servings

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Nutrition

Amount per serving ({{servings}} total)

  • Calories:
  • 344 kcal
  • 17%
  • Fat:
  • 11 g
  • 17%
  • Carbs:
  • 38.9g
  • 13%
  • Protein:
  • 20.2 g
  • 40%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 346 mg
  • 115%
  • Sodium:
  • 461 mg
  • 18%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

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Directions

  1. Rinse and drain the rice, and place in a large pot. Stir in the salt and oil, and let stand for 5 minutes.
  2. Add the pork to the rice, and stir in the water. Bring to a boil, then simmer over medium heat for 15 minutes, or until the pork is cooked through. Remove the pork from the pot with a slotted spoon, and set aside. Continue to simmer the rice for 20 minutes. Chop the pork into small cubes, and mix with the salted egg and hundred-year egg.
  3. After the 20 minutes are up, stir the pork and egg mixture back into the congee along with the oyster sauce. Serve in bowls, and garnish with ginger and green onion. Have soy sauce and pepper on the side for seasoning.
  4. All done! Now take a photo, rate it, and share your accomplishments!
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Reviews

Empenguin
41

Empenguin

2/17/2010

I think the issue people are having with the water-rice ratio is the result of the author using a different definition of a "cup" of rice. Chinese people use the little cup that comes with a rice cooker to measure rice, roughly pronounced as "muk" and is maybe half (or even less) than a standard measurement cup. Congee is generally made with a water to rice ratio of around 10:1. possibly greater. This recipe implies 5:1 which is far too little water. Hope this helps.

Butterfly Flutterby
28

Butterfly Flutterby

3/13/2005

Hi Caroline, Really enjoy your reviews. Here is what I found on your question below: "Hundred Year Egg Also called century egg, thousand-year egg and Ming Dynasty egg , these are (usually) chicken eggs preserved by being covered with lime, ashes and salt before being shallowly buried for 100 days. The lime "petrifies" the egg and makes it appear that it has been buried for at least a century. After the black outer coating and shell are removed, a firm, amber-colored white and creamy, dark green yolk are revealed. They will keep at room temperature for up to 2 weeks or up to a month in the fridge . Hundred Year Eggs are usually eaten uncooked as an appetizer, often with accompaniments such as soy sauce or minced ginger. The flavour is pungent and cheeselike." This isn't my taste and would probably just use 2 hard cooked chicken eggs if I was making this recipe.

CHANINATOR
26

CHANINATOR

3/13/2005

This recipe is completly authentic and delicious! For anyone who hasn't had the benefit of having the recipe passed down from their mom...this is it! Be sure to let the rice "marinade" in the oil and salt otherwise the congee will not have a creamy consistency.

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