Pralines

Pralines

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"Had these in New Orleans and loved them, so I tried different combos and liked this best."

Ingredients 45 m {{adjustedServings}} servings 180 cals

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Nutrition

Amount per serving ({{servings}} total)

  • Calories:
  • 180 kcal
  • 9%
  • Fat:
  • 9.4 g
  • 14%
  • Carbs:
  • 24.5g
  • 8%
  • Protein:
  • 1 g
  • 2%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 10 mg
  • 3%
  • Sodium:
  • 29 mg
  • 1%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

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Directions

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  1. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil.
  2. In large saucepan over medium heat, combine pecans, sugar, butter, brown sugar, milk and vanilla. Heat to between 234 and 240 degrees F (112 to 116 degrees C), or until a small amount of syrup dropped into cold water forms a soft ball that flattens when removed from the water and placed on a flat surface.
  3. Drop by spoonfuls onto prepared baking sheet. Let cool completely.
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Reviews 115

  1. 137 Ratings

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kikinola
2/22/2011

I'm from New Orleans and have been making pralines since I was a child. The proportions of this recipe are about right, but it leaves out the most essential step, which is beating the mixture after it reaches soft ball stage until it develops a matte sheen. The texture should have tiny crystals. The pralines should snap when you break them, and melt in your mouth. It takes some practice to know exactly when to stop beating -- too soon and you have a translucent caramel. If you go too long, the mixture is too thick to spread when you're dropping them. Another trick is to not stir the syrup after it starts boiling to prevent early crystallization. If you're tempted to scrape down the sides, don't do it -- instead, cover the pot a couple of minutes and let the steam wash them down. Also, we always used raw pecans, not toasted. A pinch of salt brings out the flavor of the pecans.

CYNDMN28
6/11/2003

These pralines were awesome! A word of caution to anyone who is not familiar with candy making: when your mixture has reached the desired consistency/temperature, remove from heat and transfer hot pan to an ice bath. Beat the mixture until light in color and thick, then spoon (using two spoons) onto a baking sheet lined with wax or parchment paper brushed with butter. Let cool, then peel wax paper or parchement away from the pralines. The ice bath part is important as if you just cool slightly and spoon out then you will have a runny mess, not the praline shape that is desired. Other than that, this recipe was AWESOME!

FRALTONY
11/13/2003

I read a lot of the recipes and reviews and combined a lot of ides for this...and here's some useful info. Iused 2 cups pecans - both chopped and whole. Toast them for 10 minutes on 300 for a crunchier praline, stirring once. 3/8 cup butter is 6 Tablespoons. Use whole milk or even light cream. Use 1/2 teaspoon salt. Vanilla keeps its flavor best if stirred in after removing from heat. The ice bath was great idea as it needed to cool to coat the pecans the best. Then I cooled them in the freezer so I could eat them right away because they were yummy.