Turkish Red Lentil Soup with Mint

Turkish Red Lentil Soup with Mint

28
Jenna 0

"This soup is divine and much like you will get at any authentic Turkish restaurant. It has dynamic flavors and a lovely mild heat. I make a big batch and eat it for lunch with crusty bread and salad the entire week. Optional: Serve with additional mint and lemon wedges."

Ingredients 1 h {{adjustedServings}} servings 168 cals

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Nutrition

Amount per serving ({{servings}} total)

  • Calories:
  • 168 kcal
  • 8%
  • Fat:
  • 5.6 g
  • 9%
  • Carbs:
  • 24.1g
  • 8%
  • Protein:
  • 6.6 g
  • 13%
  • Cholesterol:
  • < 1 mg
  • < 1%
  • Sodium:
  • 598 mg
  • 24%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

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Directions

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  1. Heat the olive oil in a large pot over high heat. Cook and stir the onion in the hot oil until it begins to soften, about 2 minutes. Stir the garlic into the onion and cook another 2 minutes. Add the diced tomatoes to the onion mixture; continue to cook and stir another 10 minutes.
  2. Pour in the chicken stock, red lentils, bulgur, rice, tomato paste, paprika, cayenne pepper, and mint to the tomato mixture; season with salt and black pepper. Bring the soup to a boil, reduce heat to medium-low, and cook at a simmer until the the lentils and rice are cooked through, about 30 minutes.
  3. Pour the soup into a blender to no more than half full. Firmly hold the lid in place and carefully start the blender, using a few quick pulses to get the soup moving before leaving it on to puree. Puree in batches until smooth; pour into your serving dish. Alternately, you can use a stick blender and puree the soup in cooking pot.
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Footnotes

  • Cook's Notes
  • The recipe is vegan if you use olive oil (instead of butter) and vegetable stock (instead of chicken).
  • Bulgur wheat can be found in most health food bulk sections, or also in international markets (or international section of your grocer) near the other Mediterranean food.
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Reviews 28

  1. 36 Ratings

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citizen521
4/21/2012

This is ezogelin soup, a traditional Turkish soup that was supposedly invented by an unhappy bride (gelin). Here in Turkey, it can be thrown together with basic ingredients found in any kitchen. This version tastes exactly like the soup you'll get at a family dinner or a kebap shop. Ezo the bride probably peeled and chopped her own tomatoes, but in this recipe the canned version works just as well. For a more robust taste, try sauteeing the tomato paste with the vegetables for a couple minutes before adding the chicken stock. Watch it closely at the end as the grains might soak up too much liquid and start sticking to the bottom. Also, crushed red pepper flakes are more traditional than cayenne pepper. Sprinkle on top and add a sprig of mint and a lemon wedge on the side for restaurant-style service.

DZALAR
4/1/2012

This is amazing!! I doubled the onion and garlic; used double the stock and 1 lb of lentils. I didn't have rice so used 1/2 c bulgar. no diced tomatoes either so use about 1/3 c tomato paste. doubled cayenne and paprika - superb! I didn't even wait to blend it, just broke off some hearty chewy bread and dug in. This rivals the soup I discovered in a Turkish restaurant in Cleveland.

MommaJ9
2/23/2012

I am in Turkey right now, learning how to make Turkish dishes and found this one. It has been a hit so far in my family especially with my husband. Says it tastes like something you would find in a restaurant. I love it too because I always seems to have these ingredients on hand.