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Macaron (French Macaroon)

Macaron (French Macaroon)

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Elle

This is the quintessential macaron (NOT macaroon) recipe. I am a baker's apprentice, and after much trial and error, we (the baker and I) finally perfected the technique. We decided to share with you all. Pipe your choice of filling on a cookie and sandwich another cookie on top. These are like cloud cookie sandwiches and are delicious if done correctly. If you want to do it the super-easy way, just fill with your favorite flavor of frosting. Enjoy!

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Nutrition

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  • Calories:
  • 189 kcal
  • 9%
  • Fat:
  • 2.6 g
  • 4%
  • Carbs:
  • 36.4g
  • 12%
  • Protein:
  • 6.9 g
  • 14%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 0 mg
  • 0%
  • Sodium:
  • 22 mg
  • < 1%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

Directions

  1. Line a baking sheet with a silicone baking mat.
  2. Beat egg whites in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment until whites are foamy; beat in white sugar and continue beating until egg whites are glossy, fluffy, and hold soft peaks. Sift confectioners' sugar and ground almonds in a separate bowl and quickly fold the almond mixture into the egg whites, about 30 strokes.
  3. Spoon a small amount of batter into a plastic bag with a small corner cut off and pipe a test disk of batter, about 1 1/2 inches in diameter, onto prepared baking sheet. If the disk of batter holds a peak instead of flattening immediately, gently fold the batter a few more times and retest.
  4. When batter is mixed enough to flatten immediately into an even disk, spoon into a pastry bag fitted with a plain round tip. Pipe the batter onto the baking sheet in rounds, leaving space between the disks. Let the piped cookies stand out at room temperature until they form a hard skin on top, about 1 hour.
  5. Preheat oven to 285 degrees F (140 degrees C).
  6. Bake cookies until set but not browned, about 10 minutes; let cookies cool completely before filling.
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Reviews

Elle
1029
8/22/2012

I am the original submitter of this recipe, so here are some tips to follow, since All Recipes changes the recipe a bit when they approve it. 1.) You have to measure the ingredients by weight. They've put the weights in the footnotes. If you measure out, say, three egg whites instead of 50g of egg whites, you might be off enough to mess up the cookie, and it won't puff up correctly (or at all). 2.) YES YOU DO HAVE TO SIFT THE INGREDIENTS! I'm so lazy. I've tried to do it without sifting. It never works out, trust me. Sift that powdered sugar and almond powder together. You won't regret it. 2.) The "silicone baking mat" in step one was originally a Silpat. I have tried making these on every surface known to man, including my cookie favorite, parchment paper. You need the Silpat or you won't be able to get the cookies off the sheet. 3.) People debate on whether it's necessary to let them set for an hour before baking. We tried setting them from 1 to 240 minutes. One hour is perfect. 4.) It is possible to mix it too much, and the cookie won't puff up when baked. Use as few strokes as possible when folding the almond into the egg whites. 5.) I highly recommend finding already-ground almonds, rather than grinding them yourself. It was our experience that grinding our own almonds resulted in an inferior cookie. They have to be ground to a very fine powder, and it's nearly impossible to do with regular kitchen equipment. Good luck!

LatinaCook
368
10/7/2012

I used gel food coloring to color the macarons and only needed a little bit. I added that at the very end of the folding (macaronage) process. I wanted two different colors, so I separated some of the batter in another bowl and carefully stirred in the colors. I do not own a scale so I had to follow the volume measurements rather than the weight measurements. It is not advisable to do so with macarons but I didn't have a choice. I made this recipe twice and the first time my macarons were lumpy/grainy. The second time I grounded up my almond meal (Bob's Mill) some more in my food processor to get a finer texture and that helped a lot. I also made sure that I folded in the almond flour and powdered sugar mixture very well into the whites mixture but was careful not to overmix. I made a strawberry buttercream to fill the pink ones and a lemon/lime buttercream for the green ones. I also used apricot preserves the first time I made them to fill the yellow ones but we didn't care for that. My next ones will have chocolate ganache and hopefully I will have my kitchen scale to ensure better measurements. Great recipe!

Cyn
238
7/22/2012

Thank you for this recipe! Have never tried a macaron but have recently been obsessed with trying them. Of course, there's nowhere to buy them within a hundred miles and I hate risking buying food online. So I tried this out. For my first try, I think I did really good, considering how hard people always say it is to get them right. Tasted good, had little feet, just didn't puff up all the way (too much liquid in mine, I think-- because i never fully follow directions). The only problem was a technical one. I didn't have a non-stick base (had JUST run out of parchment paper) so 90% of them stuck and lost their bottoms too much to ignore. It wasn't a bad thing though, because my spouse ate them all anyway. He actually didn't like the ones I filled, just the plain ones. ^-^' Will definitely do this again.