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Kolachky

Kolachky

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TRISH1452

My father and grandparents were born in Czechoslovakia. I use to watch my grandmother make these small pastries at Christmas time and I couldn't wait to eat them when she was all done. I do hope you will enjoy this recipe as much as I do. You will need a large area to work.

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Original recipe yields 48 servings

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Nutrition

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  • Calories:
  • 241 kcal
  • 12%
  • Fat:
  • 17.9 g
  • 28%
  • Carbs:
  • 17.8g
  • 6%
  • Protein:
  • 3.9 g
  • 8%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 35 mg
  • 12%
  • Sodium:
  • 37 mg
  • 1%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

Directions

  1. In a large bowl, mix together cream cheese and butter until well blended. I like to use my hands, but you can also use a wooden spoon. Mix in the flour 1 cup at a time. As the dough becomes stiff, turn it out onto the counter and knead in flour until it is no longer sticky. Continue to knead the dough for 5 minutes.
  2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Crush the walnuts to a fine consistency in a food processor. Stir in the egg and honey. On a well floured surface, roll the dough out to 1/4 inch thickness. Cut the dough into 3x3 inch squares. Place a teaspoon of filling in the center of each square. Use walnut for some and poppyseed for the rest. Roll the squares up and seal the edges. These can also be formed into triangles. Place the cookies 2 inches apart onto ungreased cookie sheets. Brush with egg white.
  3. Bake for 15 to 17 minutes in the preheated oven, or until lightly browned. When cool, dust with confectioners' sugar.
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Reviews

Chef Al
232
12/15/2007

I am a professional chef and regularly use this site for ideas, recipes and feedback. I will never rate a recipe unless it is excellent because I feel personal tastes don't ensure proper criticism. But in the case where a recipe is absolutely superb, I will give my feedback and this cookie recipe is one of the best I have tried here. I added 1/2 cup of sugar, 1 tsp of salt and 1 oz of Canadian Club Whiskey only because I wanted to enhance the creaminess of the cream cheese, and blend the flavors with the alcohol. I also remember my slovak grandmother using whiskey when she made these cookies. Your recipe brought back many happy memories. Great recipe! Thanks*****!

Deirdre
97
10/5/2008

My Mom is American born but 100% Hungarian and we both make these, although we also make apricot and prune filled 'cakes' as well as the nut. My family calls them 'little cakes' for some reason. To make a truer apricot filling than pie filling, we buy the dried apricots, then boil them until soft, then mash with sugar and a little vanilla. The prunes get the same method but no vanilla. Much better than pie filling. Also, to keep your cakes neat and not split open, make sure you pinch the corners over the filling. I then twist the dough ends after pinching to make them look pretty. We also bake them at 375 for 9-11 minutes vs. 350 degrees. I've been making these for over 30 years, since I was a small child helping my Mom and Grandma in the kitchen, and they're by far my favorite cookie of all time. Enjoy! BTW--they freeze well, just don't dust with confectioner's sugar until you serve them.

DREAHAAS
84
12/13/2003

Every year at Christmas time my Polish great grandmother would make these. This is the closest I have found to her recipe. My grandma would make them round however. I find that the smaller you make these, the less time you bake them, and the moister they come out. I suggest using a shot glass (dip the rim of the glass in flour to prevent sticking). Fill with your choice of filling and fold 2 sides in towards the center (pinch to secure) or even just leave them flat. Either way these little beauties come out perfect every time.