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Pashka

Pashka

  • Prep

    30 m
  • Ready In

    8 h 30 m
JACKIE_FETT

JACKIE_FETT

Pashka is a cheese cake-like dessert or breakfast food that is usually eaten with thick-crusted breads, but I like it plain, too. Though no cooking is needed, it does chill over night. My Bestemor has made this for me since I was a child and I have always loved it!

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Ingredients {{adjustedServings}} servings

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Original recipe yields 10 servings

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Nutrition

Amount per serving ({{servings}} total)

  • Calories:
  • 401 kcal
  • 20%
  • Fat:
  • 28.8 g
  • 44%
  • Carbs:
  • 29.2g
  • 9%
  • Protein:
  • 8.4 g
  • 17%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 75 mg
  • 25%
  • Sodium:
  • 269 mg
  • 11%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

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Directions

  1. In a medium bowl, thoroughly blend cream cheese, cottage cheese, sour cream and butter.
  2. Gradually fold in sugar, lemon extract, vanilla extract, almonds and currants.
  3. Transfer the mixture to a shallow medium dish. Cover with a cloth, and chill in the refrigerator 8 hours, or overnight.
  4. All done! Now take a photo, rate it, and share your accomplishments!
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Reviews

Tania
47

Tania

6/22/2009

First of all, the Russian dish is called PASKHA (pas-kha), not "pashka". Secondly, it is not just a dessert eaten with bread. It is a special dish you make once a year, for Easter, and eat it with the Russian Easter cake.

StephanieM
31

StephanieM

3/19/2007

I don't think this recipe is quite authentic enough to be called pashka, but is pretty tasty nonetheless. Traditional pashka is a molded cheese and uses farmer's cheese and boiled egg yolks. I like to use blueberries in place of currants (traditionally raisins), and I highly recommend opting for ricotta cheese over sour cream. Throw in some freshly-grated lemon rind and a dash of rosewater and chill in miniature bundt molds overnight. Garnish the finished cheese mold with a sprig of mint and a lemon curl and serve with a dense and crusty sweetbread. Your brunch guests will sing your praises.

JAYMDY
16

JAYMDY

5/13/2003

Pashka is traditionally served within my extended family (Mennonite background) as a bread at Easter. This recipe sounds like the pashka 'cheese' used as a spread for the sweet and thick crusted bread. I have heard the cheese is best made with 'real' cottage cheese (from local farmers) rather than that found in a local grocery store. The texture is much finer and it provides a richer taste.

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