Smoked Standing Rib Roast

Smoked Standing Rib Roast

12

"This is a sure-fired winner with any beef lover. It takes a little while to prepare, so be patient, but trust me, you will love this. The recipe yields the most tender and flavorful meat imaginable, and also has great eye appeal."

Ingredients

10 h 5 m {{adjustedServings}} servings 565 cals
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Nutrition

Amount per serving ({{servings}} total)

  • Calories:
  • 565 kcal
  • 28%
  • Fat:
  • 36.3 g
  • 56%
  • Carbs:
  • 4.1g
  • 1%
  • Protein:
  • 29.6 g
  • 59%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 108 mg
  • 36%
  • Sodium:
  • 3753 mg
  • 150%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

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Directions

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  1. Start at least 10 pounds of the charcoal in a torpedo style smoker. You need a fairly hot fire. Fill the secondary pan with cold water, and wait for the coals to turn white. Soak hickory chips in bourbon with enough water to cover. Rub the roast liberally with steak seasoning, being sure to coat all surfaces.
  2. When the coals are ready, place the roast on the top grate. Throw a few handfuls of soaked hickory chips onto the fire, and close the lid. Check the fire every 45 minutes or so, adding more charcoal as needed to keep the fire hot. Every time you check the fire, add more wood chips. Cook for 8 to 10 hours, or to your desired doneness. Use a meat thermometer to check the roast. The meat tastes best when rare: 145 degrees F (65 degrees C), but cook to your liking.
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Reviews

12
  1. 13 Ratings

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Simple but the flavor is out of this world! For real bone-deep flavor, cut the roast off the bones, slice back the fat cap, then rub seasonings all over the meat, put the fat cap back in place ...

It was good, but the meat was done in half the time the recipe said.

I recommend cooking at 225 to 250 degrees F 10 minutes per pound for rare, 15 minutes per pound for medium, or 20 minutes per pound for well done. Use a meat thermometer to confirm doneness.