Capidotada (Mexican Bread Pudding)

Capidotada (Mexican Bread Pudding)

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"Several varieties of this dessert exist, depending upon which region of Mexico or Texas it's made in. The biggest difference being the nut used. My own preference is to use pecans."

Ingredients

1 h 15 m {{adjustedServings}} servings 661 cals
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Original recipe yields 8 servings

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Nutrition

Amount per serving ({{servings}} total)

  • Calories:
  • 661 kcal
  • 33%
  • Fat:
  • 24.4 g
  • 38%
  • Carbs:
  • 102.3g
  • 33%
  • Protein:
  • 14 g
  • 28%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 22 mg
  • 7%
  • Sodium:
  • 499 mg
  • 20%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

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Directions

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  1. Preheat an oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease a 2 quart casserole dish.
  2. Combine the water, cinnamon sticks, and sugar in a large saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until the cinnamon turns the water dark brown, about 15 minutes. Remove cinnamon sticks and reserve the water.
  3. Heat the vegetable oil in a large skillet to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Fry the slices of French bread in oil until light brown, turning if necessary, about 1 minute per side. Remove toasted bread from the oil and place on paper towels to drain.
  4. Arrange half of the toasted bread in a single layer in the greased casserole dish. Sprinkle bread with half of the raisins, pecans, and onion. Arrange a layer of Cheddar cheese on top. Repeat with another layer of bread, raisins, pecans, onions, and cheese.
  5. Slowly pour the reserved cinnamon water over the casserole, allowing the bread to absorb as much of the liquid as possible. Do not allow the dish to overflow.
  6. Cover dish with aluminum foil and place in the center of the preheated oven. Bake until lightly browned and puffed, about 30 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to rest for 15 minutes before serving.
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Reviews

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  1. 11 Ratings

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This is a long-traditional Spanish dish, with roots going back to at least the 1600's, and as such many variations have arisen over time. Both spellings appear to be acceptable, and virtually al...

The original recipe of this dessert does´n have onion and other rare ingredients such tomato and cilantro, because in my country this is a dessert not a soup.

There are indeed many regional variations of this recipe. It is a Lenten dessert, and we fried the bread in a frying pan. No cheese, no onions, and we sprinkled "colaciones" on the top.