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Miguelina's Poblanos and Cheese

Miguelina's Poblanos and Cheese

  • Prep

    20 m
  • Cook

    15 m
  • Ready In

    35 m
Holly B.

Holly B.

These are a delicious side dish (but a rich one), if you don't mind a mildly chiloso (hot) pepper - less than jalapenos. The mellow cheese is the perfect accompaniment! Double or triple the recipe, as you please. These are not volcanic, but not for people who can't eat nachos with at least some jalapenos on them. Use Mexican cheeses if they are available in your area.

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Nutrition

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  • Calories:
  • 368 kcal
  • 18%
  • Fat:
  • 27.4 g
  • 42%
  • Carbs:
  • 16g
  • 5%
  • Protein:
  • 15.2 g
  • 30%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 60 mg
  • 20%
  • Sodium:
  • 378 mg
  • 15%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

Directions

  1. Rinse the poblano peppers, and remove the stem and core. Remove any remaining seeds. Heat a heavy skillet over high heat. Place peppers in the skillet, and cook until blistered and blackened. Turn frequently to blacken all of the skin. You want to make sure that no part of the pepper remains crispy. Place the peppers into a paper bag, fold the top closed, and let the peppers steam for a few minutes to loosen the skin.
  2. Heat about 1/2 inch of oil in a large heavy skillet over medium-high heat.
  3. Rinse the peppers under cold running water to remove as much of the black skin as possible. Don't get prissy about it; you can eat the skins, even if they're black - most people like some of the black skin. Next, WASH your hands well with soap and water, or you'll be sorry later when you touch your eyes or mouth.
  4. Insert a nice thick piece of cheese into each pepper, and secure the opening with a toothpick. Coat the peppers in flour. Gently place the peppers into the hot oil, and reduce the heat to medium. Fry for 3 to 5 minutes per side. Don't try to turn them over until the bottom has a firm crust on it. Try to avoid letting the cheese run out. When both sides are slightly browned and the coating is firm, remove from the pan, and drain on paper towels.
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Reviews

DONAMARU
30

DONAMARU

2/15/2005

Both ways of preparing are delicious. When peppers are on sale I buy a large quantity. I wash them, dry slightly, and oil them on the outside. Place them in a cookie sheet and broil them on high. Do not walk away, open door, check and turn as needed to brown all sides. When skins are almost black remove from oven, place in plastic bag to loosen the skin, then peel the peppers. Now you can freeze them, single layer on a cookie sheet, after that place in freezer bag. Then when you feel like having one they are ready. They will keep for months in the freezer.

NANCHE30
23

NANCHE30

8/23/2004

This is a great recipe! Very authentic, I lived in Mexico for 8 years and this is right on the money! Here's another tip for those of you who do not like battered things. Follow the same instruction here (toasting and removing the skin( but instead of coating the chiles, cut them into strips and fry them with strips of onion. Once they are cooked, add the cheese and some cream. This makes a nice gooey mess that you can eat in tacos.

Milktoast
22

Milktoast

5/1/2006

This tasted great but what a mess. I learned afterward that you can just broil the pepers in the oven in order to blacken them. Much less messy and probably better for you.

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