Orange Pudding Cakes With Marmalade Drizzle

Orange Pudding Cakes With Marmalade Drizzle

6

"For a light, elegant dessert, your guests will love Orange Pudding Cakes. Just measure the ingredients early in the day. As the roast rests, whip up the cakes; let them bake during dinner, and serve warm."

Ingredients

servings 220 cals
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Original recipe yields 8 servings

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Nutrition

  • Calories:
  • 220 kcal
  • 11%
  • Fat:
  • 6 g
  • 9%
  • Carbs:
  • 36.9g
  • 12%
  • Protein:
  • 4.7 g
  • 9%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 103 mg
  • 34%
  • Sodium:
  • 77 mg
  • 3%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

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Directions

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  1. Spray eight 6-ounce ovenproof custard cups (such as Pyrex) with vegetable cooking spray. Set them in two 9-inch round or square baking pans. Bring 1 1/2 quarts of water to boil in a tea kettle. Heat oven to 325 degrees.
  2. Whisk butter, 1/2 cup sugar and zest until smooth. Whisk in egg yolks, then flour, until smooth. Next whisk in 1/4 cup orange juice and 2 Tbs. lemon juice, then the milk, to form a thin batter.
  3. In a separate bowl, beat egg whites with a hand mixer until foamy. Gradually add remaining 1/4 cup sugar, until the whites are stiff enough to hold a peak. Gently fold the whites into the batter until just smooth.
  4. Pour batter into each custard cup. Place pans on oven rack, then carefully pour hot water into each pan, being sure to avoid getting any water on the cakes. Bake until tops are golden brown and spring back to the touch, about 25 to 35 minutes. Remove pans from oven; let custard cups stand in the water until just warm. Place a dessert plate over each custard cup; invert cake onto plate. Mix marmalade, liqueur and remaining 2 Tbs. lemon juice. Spoon sauce over cakes.

Footnotes

  • Why do these Orange Pudding Cakes get a hot bath?
  • To cook them slowly and gently. When you put a container of food (here, the batter-filled custard cups) in a larger pan filled with hot water, it allows delicate things to cook without curdling or separating. The French call this hot-water bath a bain-marie (Mary's bath), allegedly after Moses' sister, Miriam, an alchemist.

  • Copyright 2004 USA WEEKEND and columnist Pam Anderson. All rights reserved.

Reviews

6
  1. 8 Ratings

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Most helpful

Superb dessert! It's a cake, custard & souffle all rolled into one. But don't expect it to look anything like the picture. I think the pic got posted to the wrong recipe....there is no chocolat...

Most helpful critical

Very flavorful, but too light. I wanted something more substantial. The drizzle, however, is great. My husband thought he would like it on ice cream.

Superb dessert! It's a cake, custard & souffle all rolled into one. But don't expect it to look anything like the picture. I think the pic got posted to the wrong recipe....there is no chocolat...

A very light (as in not heavy) pudding. I have no idea what instant flour is, so I used normal all-purpose flour with 1/2 tsp of baking powder. The batter is very liquidy, but not to worry, afte...

The most tastiest! Yum! Good for parties or just for fun!

this cake is DELICIOUS however you will have to do some changes to the recepie since as in the picture there is a chocolate crust on the bottom,and the recepie doesnt say that,simply add crushed...

I did this recipe all wrong but it turned out fine. First of all, make sure your eggs are at room temperature! I realized too late, and my whites just wouldn't turn into peaks, but I folded them...

Very flavorful, but too light. I wanted something more substantial. The drizzle, however, is great. My husband thought he would like it on ice cream.