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Northern Ontario Partridge (Ruffed Grouse)

Northern Ontario Partridge (Ruffed Grouse)

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WANDERINGSTAR

This was my Scottish grandmother's recipe for partridge, also commonly known as ruffed grouse. Partridge breasts are seared in bacon grease, then roasted in a simple wine sauce and served with a rich gravy.

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Nutrition

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  • Calories:
  • 484 kcal
  • 24%
  • Fat:
  • 26 g
  • 40%
  • Carbs:
  • 12.1g
  • 4%
  • Protein:
  • 30 g
  • 60%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 112 mg
  • 37%
  • Sodium:
  • 1331 mg
  • 53%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C).
  2. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Place the slices of bacon in the skillet and fry until they have released their juices, but are not crispy. Remove the bacon and set aside. Place the partridge breast halves into the pan, and brown them quickly, about 2 minutes per side.
  3. Remove the partridge pieces, and wrap each one with two slices of bacon. Secure with toothpicks. Pour enough of the drippings from the skillet into a baking dish to cover the bottom. Place the partridge pieces into the dish along with the chicken broth, white wine, shallots, garlic, salt and black pepper.
  4. Roast uncovered for 45 minutes in the preheated oven. Remove drippings from the baking dish using a turkey baster, and place in a saucepan. Whisk in the flour, and cook over medium-low heat, stirring constantly, until thickened. Serve gravy with partridge.
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Reviews

Elissa
54
11/26/2008

I made this back in October on a grouse hunting trip. Before cooking the meat I "bled" it overnight to get rid of the game-y taste (refrigerate in salted water overnight). We also got as much meat as possible off the bird, and cut the "dark meat" pieces small, keeping the breasts whole. I sauteed all the meat in the skillet and threw it all into a roasting pan. After it was cooked through I removed the breasts, and put the roaster right onto the stove top to make my gravy in there. I left those little pieces of "dark" meat in the roaster and OMG did it ever make the gravy nice. I can't wait to make this again. To Terri: dry partridge is almost inevitable. It doesn't take very long to cook and even slight overcooking dries it out. Baste frequently while it roasts and try not to overcook. I cook it till it's so close to done it might as well be, take it out of the oven and let it rest, tented, in a warm spot. The temp will continue to rise which should get it just right. Use chicken temp guidelines. Good luck :)

Flyrod
32
6/30/2006

Very good recipe, can also be made in the slow cooker but with the bacon almost fully cooked before added.

TiffanyB
19
11/30/2005

Wonderful recipe. I've had trouble finding recipes for partridge, but now I need not look any further. The only problem is that the directions do not specify what to do with the garlic. I sauted it with the bacon (add garlic about half way through bacon cooking process so that it doesn't burn).