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Boiled Custard II

Boiled Custard II

Brenda

Brenda

My mother makes this each Christmas. Many of my relatives freeze the custard and eat it with a spoon.

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Ingredients {{adjustedServings}} servings

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Original recipe yields 36 servings

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Nutrition

Amount per serving ({{servings}} total)

  • Calories:
  • 128 kcal
  • 6%
  • Fat:
  • 3.5 g
  • 5%
  • Carbs:
  • 19.1g
  • 6%
  • Protein:
  • 5.3 g
  • 11%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 67 mg
  • 22%
  • Sodium:
  • 64 mg
  • 3%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

Directions

  1. In a medium mixing bowl, mix together eggs and white sugar. Stir in milk.
  2. In the lower pot of a double boiler, add water and bring to a low boil. Into the top pot, pour milk and sugar mixture. Cook over medium heat until mixture coats a spoon, about 30 minutes.
  3. Add vanilla extract and strain using a sieve. Chill before serving.
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Reviews

TALBOTTB
48

TALBOTTB

12/25/2003

Okay everyone who does not know what BOILED CUSTARD IS: If you know what egg nog is, boiled custard is that without the extra flavoring like rum, etc. Of course its not a custard pie, custard is a form of "pudding". Also, by "eggy", if you have chunks of egg, you are cooking too hot, and not stirring constantly, and not doing a sufficient job with the strainer. I have noticed that it is good to strain it twice. If you strain it when putting it in to its cooling pitcher, etc. thats gets the base of it out. Then if you strain it again when it has been cooled, that takes the clumps that have joined then. Then put it into the refrigerator and have happy holidays. If you are fed up with making this stuff, just go buy it. Now I'll tell you, not very many people carry Boiled Custard, but the brands I have seen are Sealtest, Southern Bell, and Deans. Request it if you local grocer doesn't carry it. -Talbott, KY

Carl
32

Carl

12/8/2009

Use egg yoke only. 6 Per Qt. of Milk. you want have to strain. while custard cooling; Beat egg whites, add some sugar to whites. Fold and blend into custard. You can use whip cream instead of egg whites if you like. This is an old Tennessee recipe that's 200 plus years old.

JKing
20

JKing

5/4/2010

This is my aboslute favorite at Christmas. But I do it the way my great-grandmother did it. I just use the yolks when it's cooking and then when it's finished I whip the whites with some sugar, and then fold the whites into the custard while it's cooling. Then you don't have to strain it and you get good little chunks of meringue-like pieces.

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