How to Season Cast Iron

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Cast iron pans, pots, skillets, griddles, and Dutch ovens are practically indestructible. They can last for generations. The key to cast iron’s longevity is seasoning. In this video, you’ll learn how to season, cook with, and care for cast iron cookware so it lasts for years and years. Seasoning cast iron is simple. We’ll show you how a thin, protective layer of vegetable oil, baked into the skillet, helps prevent rust from developing. Re-seasoning your cast iron pan will build up over time a terrific non-stick surface. You’ll see how to properly prepare your cast iron pan before you season it for the first time, and you’ll learn why this is the only time you’ll want to use soap to clean it. You’ll also discover the benefits of cooking with cast iron—the dry, even heat, which browns meats, crisps baked goods, and caramelizes vegetables like no other type of cookware. You’ll also see how easy it is to clean a well-seasoned cast iron skillet! Cast iron, it’s not just for the chuck wagon! See more how-to videos >>

Comments

LAURALEW

LAURALEW

I have some old slightly rusty cast iron pans that I wish to reseason and use. My husband says the rust is nutritious and I shouldn't try to get rid of it; his mom's pans are all rusty. I would think rust would cause problems with the non-stick finish. Is coarse salt the best way to remove rust?

teejay5324

teejay5324

Eh, Paul - you are referring to degrees Celsius, the tutorial refers to Farenhieght. Hope that clears things up.

Paul McManus

Paul McManus

Lily, the smoke point for safflower oil is 225. The smoke point for vegetable oil 356-370 depending on type. Wrong type oil for the temps required. Hope that helps!

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